Dungeon Siege III

Why is This Spider Carrying a Gun?

Dungeon Siege III showed us that nature loves to give us loot in the strangest places. Too bad we have ten more of the same thing.
Author: Scott Rodgers
Published: July 17, 2011
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I feel as though I must be upfront about the fact that I have never played any of the previous Dungeon Siege games. I am a very loot driven RPG player, so the idea of getting a lifetime’s worth in one playthrough was enticing, even if it felt a bit hollow in retrospect (more on that later). The biggest reason that I was chosen to review this game, however, is a bit of a strange tale. See, my significant other is one of the biggest hack and slash RPG fans out there and she adores games that require her to have a spreadsheet in one hand and a controller in the other. So really, this was a great fit, especially for her and let me tell you that for two days straight she streamrolled through the campaign in about twelve hours. Since she’s also my most trusted source for editing and played quite a bit of the game herself, I decided to let her sprinkle in her opinions. Where you see the greater and less-than signs is where she chipped in her opinion, or in the case of the story paragraphs, wrote them all on her own.


Dungeon Siege III is a simple game. You choose one of four characters and slash, blast, or shoot your way through waves of enemies. The combat is a bit shallow but trust me when I say that it works brilliantly. The stance system allows for the player to quickly go from a crowd clearer to being able to focus on a single enemy with a single button press (for example, Lucas can go from wielding a giant dual handed sword to a short sword and shield combo). This inclusion makes combat a bit frantic but the speed is a welcome change of pace from other games in the genre. Normal enemies are generally taken down with ease while mini-bosses require a bit more attention and savvy. Major bosses on the other hand ratchet the game to another level of difficulty, even on lower difficulties, and require quick reflexes and planning. Even though they were far beyond what the rest of the game has never once did either of us feel as though they were cheap, just good old challenging fun.


The story is that the Legionaires are being killed off after Jeyne Kassynder rallies the people of Ehb and Azunite Church against them. Without going into details and spoiling everything, let’s just say she sure does hold a grudge and it seems like the whole world is against the Legionaires at this point. The cutscenes that progressed the story along looked like charcoal drawings and had subtitles (sorry, you’re going to have to read if you want to know the story). I’m a sap for anything that is artsy and I was sucked into the story just because of the cutscenes. It’s little things like this that set games apart for me and keep me interested enough to dedicate whole days to playing an RPG.>

And dedicate she did, trust me.
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